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Tool: Use “One Simple Thing” for goal setting

Google makes available a popular goal-setting practice to encourage personal well-being called “One Simple Thing.” Individuals can set a goal to improve their well-being and work-life flexibility, ...

Tool: Structure career conversations with GROW

To help managers structure career conversations with their teams, Google uses the GROW model (developed by Graham Alexander, Alan Fine, and Sir John Whitmore) as one tool to guide the process. Goal...

Tool: Foster psychological safety

Of the five key dynamics of effective teams that the researchers identified, psychological safety was by far the most important. The Google researchers found that individuals on teams with higher p...

Tool: Help teams determine their own needs

Beyond just communicating the study results, the Google research team wanted to empower Googlers to understand the dynamics of their own teams and offer tips for improving. So they created a survey...

Tool: Use the interviewer training checklist

Here’s a list of questions that address basic practices and general information to consider when training your interviewers. Do your interviewers... Understand your company hiring process and the...

Tool: Review Google’s new manager training

These course materials were originally designed for Google managers to help them transition from individual contributor roles to manager roles. In addition to building skills, the curriculum incorp...

Tool: Give your own unbiasing workshop

Given that we’re dealing with something unconscious, most people don’t realize when they’ve made an unconsciously biased comment or action. This means calling it out is an important ingredient to m...

Tool: Share the interviewer cheat sheet

Here’s a list of practices and tips to help prepare your interviewers and remind them why interviewing is so important.

Tool: Analyze the data and look for variance

Once you have selected your variables, it’s time to begin the actual analysis. This requires someone with proficiency in statistics, including an understanding of standard deviation, variance, regr...

Tool: Try Google’s Manager Feedback Survey

Google gathers feedback from employees on their managers through a semi-annual Manager Feedback Survey. Googlers answer confidentially and managers receive a report of anonymized, aggregated feedba...

Tool: Use the discussion guide to start a conversation

Considering when and where team interactions might be influenced by unconscious bias can help you identify opportunities for unbiasing. These nine questions are conversation starters to help your t...

Tool: Use a grading rubric

For a structured interview question, creating a grading rubric can help assess multiple candidates' answers and to fairly and consistently compare applicant responses. For the attribute or quality ...

Tool: Measure candidate experience

To better understand and measure candidates’ experiences in the hiring process, Google sends a survey to candidates that comes onsite, regardless of whether they received a job offer. The hiring te...

Tool: Try the job description checklist

When writing a job description, Google considers what the job seeker needs to know from the company and what the company wants to know about the job seeker. The hiring team uses a checklist like th...

Tool: Hold effective 1:1 meetings

In the Project Oxygen study, the team found that our higher-scoring managers are more likely than lower-scoring managers to have frequent 1:1 (“one-on-one”) meetings with their team members. Meetin...

Tool: Use unbiasing checklists

Research suggests that checklists can help reduce the influence of unconscious bias in decision-making. Unbiasing checklists are integrated into some of Google's people processes in an effort to hi...

Tool: Give your own unbiasing workshop

Once the workshop was piloted and its impact evident, the team worked to make it available to all Googlers by using a “train-the-trainer” approach - getting Googlers to teach other Googler facilita...

Tool: Grade OKRs

At Google, OKRs are usually graded on a scale of 0.0 to 1.0, 1.0 meaning the objective was fully achieved. Each individual key result is graded and then, using a rough average, correspondingly the ...
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